At times trying to pull dogs from a shelter can be tough.  I have joked about it saying I bet it’s easier to adopt a child then to pull a dog on the euthanization list.  Back in September-October, Pearl’s Place was tagged on a number of different dogs in different shelters.  One of the shelters had hundreds of dogs in their care.  It took two days to get our application looked at only to be informed that the dog wasn’t even available any longer.  I chalked it up to we weren’t supposed to have that dog, frustration at it’s finest. 

A couple of days go by and we are tagged again on a post for Roscoe.  Roscoe is a young 1-year old boxer mix dog and was located in Baton Rouge, LA.  His skin was void of hair, bright red and inflamed and he had been in the shelter since July.  He was surrendered because his owner couldn’t take care of his medical needs.  After going through days, the previous week trying to pull dogs, I almost said no.  Not because I didn’t want to help, but because Baton Rouge is a 6.5hr drive one way on a good day! 

I made a call to Deb and simply asked, “You up for a road trip??”  First, she said Yes, then asked “to where?!”

When things are supposed to work out, they fall into place.  I commented that we would pull him but needed help with transportation.  A group of three women on the Louisiana end got to work!  The shelter called me and during our conversation she said, “Roscoe has a sister, Maxine, that came in with him, can you take her?”  In my regular fashion, the logical answer would have been no, but said “Absolutely!!”

Saturday afternoon after I got done work, Deb and I got in the car and off we went!  We only had to get to Beaumont, TX.  One of the great women that helped put this all together was bringing them half way to us. 

Road trips can be full of giggles, life stories, and lessons.  Our trip down was a breeze with the sunshine and silly girl conversation and the anticipation of meeting these two dogs that needed us. 

We met at our meeting point and there were our dogs, oh so happy to be out of the shelter!  Roscoe and Maxine loaded up and it was time to head home.  I was the driver so that made Deb the navigator.  I kept asking her “Are you sure we are going the right way?”, her answer was always “Yup”, so we continued on.  Let’s just say our drive home in the dark wasn’t as smooth as the drive down in the sun! I started thinking this road reminds me of the murder shows of the women who are never seen again!  Miles and miles of nothing!!  No cars, no houses, and no lights!  What two women can laugh and joke about when they are tired! 

We made it home that night safe and sound and with a deeper friendship and two more rescue dogs that needed care, love and a forever home.